Thursday, June 26, 2008

Relational database management system (RDBMS)

A Relational database management system (RDBMS) is a database management system (DBMS) that is based on the relational model as introduced by E. F. Codd. Most popular commercial and open source databases currently in use are based on the relational model.

A short definition of an RDBMS may be a DBMS in which data is stored in the form of tables and the relationship among the data is also stored in the form of tables.

Monday, June 23, 2008

Not be enough virtual memory - SQL Server

For each updated database, SQL Server allocates at least one 64-KB block for use in formatting log records before they are written to disk. This allocation occurs when the first log record is generated for the database, such as during an INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE statement. Depending on the activity and the size of the generated log records, subsequent modifications might trigger the allocation of additional 64-KB allocations. SQL Server 7.0 will allocate no more than three 54-KB blocks. In SQL Server 2000, the upper number of allocations for each database is a function of the number of processors that SQL Server is configured to use.

Use the -g startup parameter to leave additional, unreserved virtual memory available for these database allocations. The -g parameter is documented in the Readme.txt of the SQL Server 7.0 service pack, and in SQL Server 2000 Books Online. The "More Information" section in this article includes the settings that Microsoft recommends you use to determine the appropriate value for this setting.

Sql Server 2005 - Twelve Tips For Optimizing Query Performance

1. Turn on the execution plan, and statistics
2. Use Clustered Indexes
3. Use Indexed Views
4. Use Covering Indexes
5. Keep your clustered index small.
6. Avoid cursors
7. Archive old data
8. Partition your data correctly
9. Remove user-defined inline scalar functions
10. Use APPLY
11. Use computed columns
12. Use the correct transaction isolation level

Original Article

Tuesday, June 10, 2008

LINQ - .NET Language Integrated Query

LINQ to SQL is an O/RM (object relational mapping) implementation that ships in the .NET Framework "Orcas" release, and which allows you to model a relational database using .NET classes. You can then query the database using LINQ, as well as update/insert/delete data from it.

LINQ to SQL fully supports transactions, views, and stored procedures. It also provides an easy way to integrate data validation and business logic rules into your data model.

Developers can use LINQ with any data source. They can express efficient query behavior in their programming language of choice, optionally transform/shape data query results into whatever format they want, and then easily manipulate the results. LINQ-enabled languages can provide full type-safety and compile-time checking of query expressions, and development tools can provide full intellisense, debugging, and rich refactoring support when writing LINQ code.

LINQ supports a very rich extensibility model that facilitates the creation of very efficient domain-specific operators for data sources. The "Orcas" version of the .NET Framework ships with built-in libraries that enable LINQ support against Objects, XML, and Databases.

For More details about the LINQ :
Part 1: Introduction to LINQ to SQL
Part 2: Defining our Data Model Classes
Part 3: Querying our Database
Part 4: Updating our Database
Part 5: Binding UI using the ASP:LinqDataSource Control
Part 6: Retrieving Data Using Stored Procedures
Part 7: Updating our Database using Stored Procedures
Part 8: Executing Custom SQL Expressions
Part 9: LINQ to SQL (Part 9 - Using a Custom LINQ Expression with the control)